• Are You Guilty Of Saying These Phrases Wrong?

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    Saw this on my friends Facebook page from  SheKnows.com. I’m guilty of a couple of these, I won’t tell you which ones though. ~Randi 175501316

    WHAT’S RIGHT, WHAT’S WRONG

    Who would have thought that so many people misuse the most common phrases? Let’s take a look at 17 phrases you may be saying incorrectly.

    “I could care less” and “I could literally eat a horse” are two of the most commonly misused phrases in the English language. While you may or may not be using them correctly, chances are you hear phrases being misused all the time — and it’s probably one of your biggest pet peeves! Let’s look at 17 of the most commonly misused phrases and learn the proper way to say them. We won’t tell anyone if you forward it to a few people you may know.

    1

    “IT’S A DOGGY-DOG WORLD.”

    Correct way to say it: It’s a dog-eat-dog world.

    Meaning: There’s no such thing as a “doggy-dog” world. The expression goes all the way back to 43 B.C. when Roman scholar and writer Marcus Terentius Varro (comparing principles of humanity to that of animals) stated that even “a dog will not eat dog.” A “dog-eat-dog” world is defined as ruthless behavior to get what you want… so look out.

    2

    “FOR ALL INTENSIVE PURPOSES…”

    Correct way to say it: For all intents and purposes…

    Meaning: “Intensive” means your purpose is intense. “Intents and purposes” means practical.

    3

    “I’M SUPPOSE TO GO GROCERY SHOPPING TODAY.”

    Correct way to say it: I’m supposed to go grocery shopping today.

    Meaning: “Suppose to” is grammatically incorrect. Don’t forget to add a “d” to the end.

    4

    “THE BABY LITERALLY SCREAMED ALL NIGHT.”

    Correct way to say it: The baby screamed for half the night.

    Meaning: “Literally” implies that it’s true. Don’t say “literally” unless it’s a fact!

    5

    “THE TODDLER SPILLED HIS MILK ON ACCIDENT.”

    Correct way to say it: The toddler spilled his milk by accident.

    Meaning: Most people say “on” instead of “by.” Surprisingly, “by” is grammatically correct.

    READ THE REST HERE!

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